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Meriden’s Dr. Miguel Cardona: From Student To Administrator

Miguel and Marissa Cardona with their children Miguel Jr. and Celine on vacation in San Juan, Puerto Rico, July 2015. Photo courtesy Miguel Cardona

Miguel and Marissa Cardona with their children Miguel Jr. and Celine on vacation in San Juan, Puerto Rico, July 2015.
Photo courtesy Miguel Cardona

 
Lisa S. Lenkiewicz
CTLatinoNews.com

 

Dr. Miguel Cardona, whose grandfather left Aguada, Puerto Rico (and the world of sugar caning) to come to Hartford to work in the tobacco fields, first became the youngest school principal in the state of Connecticut at age 27.  He now has just added another feather to his cap with his recent appointment as assistant superintendent for teaching and learning in the Meriden school system.

Cardona was also an Alma Exley Scholar—only the second recipient of the scholarship program when it started in 1997–created to “honor future teachers who mirror the diversity of the student population, understand students’ diverse cultural backgrounds, serve as positive role models for minority and non-minority students and provide a classroom environment that respects and celebrates a …

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CT’s Technical High Schools-Preparing Students For Much More Than Just A Job

AnnabelleDiaz-VicePrincipal-PrinceTechAnabelle Diaz, Prince Tech’s vice principal

Bill Sarno
CTLatinoNews.com
 

When Anabelle Diaz entered A.I. Prince Technical High School in Hartford about 20 years ago, the Puerto Rico-born teenager had a specific vision of what she wanted to achieve.

The Hartford resident’s goal was to earn a high school diploma and a license in hairdressing and cosmetology. These would be the tickets to take her beyond the tough neighborhood where she grew up.

However, along the way she learned that the Connecticut Technical School System is all about choices and options. The path she elected eventually brought her back to Prince Tech where she is now a vice principal, supervises 26 instructors and serves as a role model to Latino students. She also is on the verge of earning a doctorate in educational leadership with a focus on adolescent literacy.

Within the state’s Latino population, there is a growing awareness that …

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Court Rules Arizona Law That Banned Mexican-American Studies May Be Discriminatory

Tony Diaz, co-founder of a group organized to back the banned Mexican-American studies program, exited the courthouse after oral arguments before the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals | Roque Planas/HuffPost

Tony Diaz, co-founder of a group organized to back the banned Mexican-American studies program, exited the courthouse after oral arguments before the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals | Roque Planas/HuffPost

 

A federal appeals court on Tuesday ordered a trial to assess whether an Arizona law that was passed to ban a Mexican-American studies curriculum in Tucson’s public schools intentionally discriminates against Hispanics.

The 2-1 ruling from a three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals largely upheld the constitutionality of Arizona’s ethnic studies law, rejecting arguments brought by plaintiffs that the statute is overly broad and vague. However, the ruling kicked the case back to the Arizona district court in Tucson, saying enough evidence exists to require a trial to show whether the law was “motivated at least in part by a discriminatory intent.”

If there were evidence of discriminatory intent in the law’s design or …

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